In Search of the Peróns

No other two people epitomize Argentina as much as Evita and Juan Perón. Ask anyone—native or foreigner—who the most famous person is of this southern country is, and it won’t be tango legend Carlos Gardel or rock’s bad boy Charly García, nor will it be literary legends like Jorge Luis Borges and Julio Cortázar. The first name to slip off the tongue will be either Juan or Evita. Their presences continue to permeate the landscape and politics of 21st-century Argentina. V!VA Travel Guides Argentina can help you go in search of the Peróns.

 

• Juan & Evita : Photo by Iversonic (http://www.flickr.com/photos/iversonic/2785405124)

By the time General Juan Domingo Perón (1895-1974) and Eva Duarte (1919-1952) married in 1945, Juan was a career military man who had been a coup participant, president and political prisoner, and Evita was a famous actress and co-owner of a radio station. With Juan’s election to the presidency in 1946, this couple forged one of the most lasting political movements in Argentine history. They supported the interests of the working class and poor. Evita was Vice President, Minister of Health, Minister of Labor and Social Welfare of Argentina and head of the Eva Perón Foundation. She led campaigns for social justice and equality, and promoted women’s political rights and involvement. Her death from cancer in 1952 was intensely mourned. When Juan was overthrown in 1955, the military junta kidnapped her body and secretly buried it under a false name in Italy. She returned to Argentina in 1974, when General Perón was in power for a third time.

 

 

Museo Familia de Perón in Camarones.

The nation’s capital echoes with their footsteps, but that is not where the journey begins. You must go deep into the Patagonia, to Camarones. When he was a child, Juan’s family moved to this small Atlantic coast village where his father was the Justice of Peace. The family’s home is now the Museo Familia de Perón. The extensive exhibits recount his family’s history, and explain the socio-political revolution he and Eva launched.

 

 

 

 

Museo Evita.

The majority of sites related to General Perón and Evita, of course, are in Buenos Aires. Here you can imagine Evita waving to the masses of workers and poor from the balcony of the presidential palace, the Casa Rosada. Take a tour of this sprawling, rose-colored building in the city’s heart and visit the museum, which has much information on the Perón period. Then head north to Palermo neighborhood, to Museo Evita. This museum, located in the former Fundación Eva Perón, is dedicated to her life and works. Afterwards, make the pilgrimage to the upscale Cementerio Recoleta, where her black-marble tomb draws thousands of devotees every year. (It isn’t hard to find: It is always bedecked with flowers and other gifts to this “Spiritual Leader of the Nation.”)

 

 

Evita, however, was never buried alongside her husband, General Juan Domingo Perón. For many decades he was interred in working-class Cementerio Charcarita, on the west side of Buenos Aires. But now the General lies in rest even further away from his belovéd Evita. In 2008, his body was moved to a new mausoleum in his hometown San Vicente, 64 kilometers (39 miles) south of Buenos Aires. This imposing monument on his former estate begins beneath an image of Eva crying on Perón’s shoulder. A waterway then leads visitors to his new resting place. Also on the grounds is Museo 17 de Octubre, which is dedicated to the Peróns. The Duarte family has refused to allow Eva to join her husband.

Evita's grave.

The search for the Peróns doesn’t end there. You can look for it in the social movements and politics of Argentina. Evita still is so revered by many homes that you can find her picture displayed alongside loved ones.

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