Culinary Adventures in Argentina

Argentina offers travelers many types of adventures, like riding with gauchos across the pampas or hiking in Parque Nacional Los Glaciares around majestic FitzRoy and to breath-taking Perito Moreno Glacier. There are skiing and snowboarding Bariloche, and riding dogsleds in Ushuaia. No matter the season, no matter the place, Argentina has something for everyone. And that includes for aficionados of exotic cooking.

 

Indeed—Argentina’s cuisine goes much beyond its beef and wine. The country’s varied landscapes extend to the dinner plate. V!VA Travel Guides Argentina extends a fork to help you undertake culinary adventures in Argentina.

 

If you are really a parrilla (BBQ) fan, ready to carve into huge chunks of meat, then head to an espeleto joint in Misiones Province, in the Northeast of the country. At restaurants like ­­­­Kelo or La Querencia in Posadas, the waiters come to your table with meat speared on a sword. Another specialty of this region is ­­­­galeto: chicken grilled on a spit, stuffed with smoked ham, sweet peppers and tomatoes.

Carpincho, or capybara.

The Northeast also offers all sorts of temptations out of the ordinary. One of the local denizens is the world’s largest rodents, the carpincho (capybara). You can buy the farm-raised meat in Mercedes (Corrientes Province).

 

On the other side of the Paraná River, in Formosa, another regional resident arrives to restaurant plates: the yacaré or spectacled caiman. This tender meat can be tried at La Ribera, as a grilled steak or in empanadas.

A yacaré, or spectacled caiman.

Northwest Argentina has its share of culinary adventures, too. Because of its strong Andean cultural identity, you’ll see llama appearing on some menus. Cabrito (kid goat) and goat cheese are also common. But the real treat is suri (rhea), an ostrich relative. El Almacén in Tafí del Valle prepares empanadas from farm-raised birds.

 

At the other end of the country, in the Patagonia, lamb is most commonly thrown on the coals. In the summertime, you’re more likely to see campers throwing sides of this meat onto the grill instead of beef. Don’t miss the opportunity to chow down on some of the world-renowned Patagonian cordero.

 

All of Argentina’s meats, though, do not come from the land. One thing only found in its Patagonia is the Giant Patagonian Oyster, which is about the size of a hand. Try this delectable seafood in a whiskey sauce at El Rey de Mariscos in Las Grutas.

 

Another seafood delight found in the southernmost seas around Tierra del Fuego is centolla or king crab. Unfortunately, it is quite pricy in Argentina. It is much cheaper on the other side of the border in Chile. In the Fueguian village Porvenir, you can try centolla in the Club Croata’s Trilogía Austral crêpe, featuring shellfish, oysters and king crab.

 

These are just some of the culinary adventures V!VA Travel Guides Argentina can take you on. Argentine law states that any exotic game served must be farm-raised, not hunted, in order to protect wild populations Before ordering, ask whether the meat is cazado (hunted) or de criadero (farm raised). And don’t forget to have a bottle of wine to accompany your repast.

 

Buen provecho!

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